Genetically Modified: Building Better Tomatoes

The road towards making genetic modification a prime human benefit may still be a long way off. But genetically modified tomatoesresearchers and scientists are slowly finding their way of getting there. Although genetic modification may have gotten some bad press lately, it shouldn’t stop scientists from exploring more of a technology that is supposed to provide many benefits to human kind in the future. And there are certain advances and developments that would surely bring genetic modification in the right direction.

 

The ordinary tomato has been the focus of many genetic modifying experiments for a number of years now. And as such studies continue on, scientists are able to slowly perfect the craft of ultimately making genetic modification work for the greater good. And just recently, new advances has been made. According to recent news from the Science Daily, (see http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070307075653.htm), a new strain of genetically modified tomatoes has been developed. Scientists once have successfully developed genetically modified tomatoes that have a longer shelf life, but now they have tried in making them more nutritious.

 

The new tomatoes were engineered in order to make a full day’s worth of folate, a nutrient that is vital to the body’s continuous growth and development. This new breakthrough shows the promising future for genetic modification and being able to make life healthier for people in the future. This development would especially be very beneficial to those people in the developing countries with limited access to food and adequate nutrition. Such genetically modified tomatoes can be grown to help curb down the lack of nutrition that people in such countries. Pregnant women would especially benefit since they may have a better need for the nutrient folate in order to help their babies develop normally.

 

And if things push through, scientists may then move on to genetically modifying other vital crops such as cereals in order to help alleviate the food shortage in developing countries. It would be a slow but a more positive step towards being accepted finally by more people in the future.

 
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